Cloud catcher

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Summer sun, winter cold and all the other types of weather have taken their toll on the wood on this old library building. But the window glass still catches the reflection of the clouds passing by.

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Secured

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It was good to see that the front door of this old house was secured to prevent access. Most of the house has been torn down to make way for a new, quick build. Not sure this would have been much good as a rehab anyhow. Given that I grew up about 2-3 miles from this place I simple cannot recall what this house looked like intact. Odd how the memory does this. I wish I had noticed when I took this image the old pencil sharpener located between the big front window and front door window there on the white trim. The sun was so bright that I just didn’t see it, and I expect the whole building is down by now. Wavy glass windows, bits of pottery, sharpener and all.

The light spills in

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Sunday we visited the Lexington/ Concord Massachusetts area. There were several old houses along our walk that sit in isolated locations, the road at a distance. Time capsules of a sort, neither in use nor out, their windows continue to watch the world go by. Only memories inhabit these houses, unless you believe in spirits or ghosts. How many tracks has the sun cut along these floors, sweeping across it and illuminating the dust motes. How many storms have battered the walls, cold drafts sneaking in to chill the ankles of those gathered around the fireplace. How many small feet pattered through the rooms, out the doors and on the stairs. While the building might not be old in comparison to castles and ancient dwellings, it is still part of a full, rich human history that is timeless.

 

Improving

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This old 1849 mill is getting a do-over, a second chance after years of sitting empty. It has suffered from neglect and bad window changes. But here it shows what the new windows will look like, ahhhh just lovely. The developer could have gone for a squared off window and filled in the arch, but instead chose to get exactly what this facade needed to be brought back to life. The old windows are lovely too, but in rough shape, hopefully they will be salvaged. Currently asbestos removal is being done, but through some open upper windows around the corner the underside of the floors are visible, beautiful wide warm toned wood with huge beams. There was a plan years ago to make this a mixed use of businesses, art studios and start ups space. Now I believe it will be mid to high end housing units. Still, it is at least going to be used and not left to deteriorate more. Parking might be a bit of a problem as it is a big building not originally designed for residences. But it is a good example of re use instead of demolition.

Tread lightly

While visiting in the land of limited cell service, I stopped by this slice of days gone by. Had it been geographically correct it felt like maybe Laura Ingalls or Nellie Oleson might appear and start browsing the shelves. But what really caught my eye as I passed , was the vintage bike standing in the window. Once upon a time, not that long ago, this was a functioning store. Then it became an antiques store, now it sits quietly at a country intersection as the traffic flows passed. I don’t recall it ever being in use, but my mother does. Apparently the house behind it is where the proprietors lived. It is now empty, as is the one next to it. Though we did see a raccoon on the roof, so I guess unoccupied is a relative term. It can be hard to tell sometimes as people seem to walk out and close the door behind them, leaving personal belongings in place like some strange tableau. It can make it a bit unnerving to approach as I certainly have no desire to encounter a resident in what seemed to be an abandoned house! Often in these places, even when empty, there is a palpable feel of previous lives still being played out. Tread lightly, tread lightly.